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8 Cartoons We Watched but Don’t Remember Anything About

Anyone else remember these?

| March 10, 2017

8 Cartoons We Watched

but Don’t Remember

Anything About

By Therese Aseoche

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Here’s a challenge for you — list as many cartoons as you can that you’ve watched in your childhood years under 3 minutes.

Chances are you listed down the still-frequently-talked-about shows like Powerpuff Girls, Teen Titans, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, and so on. But there are some, if not a lot, of cartoons that we did watch, only our memories failed us when it came to remembering what those shows were actually about.

Here are just some of them.

2 Stupid Dogs

Nope, it isn’t the Ren & Stimpy show, nor is it a carbon copy of it. 2 Stupid Dogs was a milder, more kid-friendly and definitely cuter version that tells of the daily misadventures of a Big Dog and a Little Dog in the city. They often found themselves either in common or in strange situations — like being at a shopping mall or getting stuck in a space shuttle—and their idiocy always led to disastrous results.

 

Fillmore!

Fillmore! was a cartoon parody of police dramas in the 70s and revolved around a Middle School delinquent-turned-safety patroller. Cornelius Fillmore, together with his partner-in-crime Ingrid Third, solved PG-rated crimes like school mascot kidnapping and scooter theft.

 

Sheep in the Big City

Via Imgur

It entertained mature audiences with its sophisticated humor, puns, and fourth-wall violations, so it’s no surprise if you don’t remember anything about this cartoon (you wouldn’t have understood any of the jokes). Sheep in the Big City followed an anthropomorphic sheep that was forced to leave its farm for the city to escape the hands of General Specific and his Sheep-powered ray gun.

 

Hi Hi Puffy AmiYumi

Via Tumblr

In the advent of the rising popularity of anime and Japanese culture in Western countries, Cartoon Network took a leap of faith with Hi Hi Puffy AmiYumi, an American cartoon based on real-life J-Pop duo PUFFY AmiYumi, and was successful with its target audience of kids aged 6 to 11. The whole show had just been about two pop stars with opposing personalities taking the world by storm with their musical talent, humor, and style. PUFFY AmiYumi — known also for singing the opening of Teen Titans — were actively involved in the production, often making appearances during the start or end of the show.