8 New Year Superstitions Filipinos Still Practice

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8 New Year Superstitions Filipinos Still Practice

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| December 31, 2017

8 New Year Superstitions

Filipinos Still Practice

By Patti Sunio

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Because of how the Spanish (Catholicism and other religious beliefs) and the Chinese (ancient traditions and cultural practices) have influenced our ancestors, to this day, Filipino families have become very superstitious. And to this day, many of these practices are still implemented in Filipino homes, despite not really understanding how it has originated.

New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day are no different—it may even be considered the most important time for Filipinos to actually adhere to their superstitious practices. Here are 8:

EATING KAKANIN

Kakanin or sticky rice is a popular delicacy in the Philippines. Certain provinces even have kakanin specialties and these are usually brought home as pasalubong from a vacation. But the kakanin is a New Year staple, too. Its sticky nature is believed to make bonds between families more long-lasting.

 

NO CHICKEN FOR NEW YEAR

Isang kahig, isang tuka, goes the saying. Filipinos don’t include chicken in their New Year handa because it might bring them food scarcity in the coming year. The saying pertains to the chickens’ way of living, having to scratch the soil only to find a very small piece of food.

 

FILL YOUR POCKETS AND WALLETS WITH MONEY

It’s one way to ensure that wealth will come in abundance the coming year. Don’t risk an empty wallet or coin purse!

 

JUMP AS HIGH AS YOU CAN AT 12 MIDNIGHT

Especially for growing kids, the second the New Year ushers in, they must jump as high as they can, to guarantee that they will grow as tall as can be. They may jump for as many times as they want, even for the entire first minute of the New Year, for good measure.