8 Reasons Why “The Greatest Showman” is a Must-See

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8 Reasons Why “The Greatest Showman” is a Must-See

No, not that Showman.

| February 9, 2018

8 Reasons Why

“The Greatest Showman”

is a Must-See

By Macky Macarayan

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In “The Greatest Showman,” Hugh Jackman is back in musical form as P.T. Barnum, the legendary showman behind the traveling circus dubbed “The Greatest Show on Earth.” Although various criticisms have been hurled against the film, mostly for its inaccurate portrayal of Barnum and the various issues it ignores, there are still plenty of reasons to go see the film.

The music

It’s logical that a musical ought to have captivating music, and “The Greatest Showman” features a lot of songs you’ll soon be humming along to. From the Golden Globe-winning “This is Me,” to the romantic pop ballad “Rewrite the Stars,” even non-fans of musicals might find themselves tapping their feet.

 

Hugh Jackman

Jackman proved before that he can sing and act in “Les Miserables,” but here he also dances to finely-choreographed musical numbers. As Barnum, Jackman juggles the roles of a father, a husband and a showman with compelling results.

 

The spectacle

People who have seen the film went in for the same reason people went to the circus— they want to be entertained, and while “The Greatest Showman” may be slim on the historical accuracy, it is never short on thrills. The film’s energy never lets up, as the filmmakers pile one musical number after another. One might say it is a variety show with some sliver of a story, but a damn good variety show it is.

 

It inspires to dream, and dream big

Basically a rags-to-riches story, “The Greatest Showman” tells us that perseverance and resourcefulness are qualities that should never be underestimated. The limits of one’s achievements should only be dictated by the limits of imagination. If at all, the film affirms yet again that no dream is invalid, and that we have to do something to achieve that dream. In Barnum’s case, he used publicity and spectacle as his weapons of choice.