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Patently Pinoy Gamer Words

Billiards is so 90s.

| January 19, 2017


Moments from Volleyfriends UAAP Volleyball Kick Off SHAD

With the recent victory of the PH Team TNC Pro Team at the Dota2 World ESG Championships, it has become clear that the Philippines has steadily become a formidable force to be reckoned with in the international gaming community. Whether in team games or MMORPG adventures, they’ve made their mark; hackin’ en shootin’ noypi style.

But how can you tell? With so many Southeast Asian players hidden behind the characters they are using, how can one identify a Filipino from the rest? Without the use of cameras and the obvious Philippine flag icons, here are 8 of the sure-fire ways to know that you’re playing with–and being communicated to –by #pinoygamers!

1. No-ob (Noob, but pronounced syllabically)

Probably the youngest one on the list, you can hear this being thrown around only by #pinoygamers, already irritated by the utter failure happening before their eyes. When just one syllable won’t cut it–yeah boy, it’s pinoy!

2. Dapa! (lie/lying face-down)

A Filipino word, home-town heroes use this to exclaim the satisfaction of felling an adversary –after being struck by the swift and terrible, Andres Bonifacio-inspired blow–that only a true noypi can deliver! A self-congratulatory, chest-beating description of a vanquished opponent. Yown… dapa!

 

3. Basag (Break)

Another Filipino word and contemporary of “Dapa”, this can be used both as a verb and a noun, but only for structures, buildings or any inanimate object that requires “rapid remodeling”. Either rallying their teammates to destroy a lane tower or to describe its ruins after being dealt with, this is a sure way to know that there are #pinoygamers in your midst.

 

4. OG ( On-Game)

An abbreviated, albeit grammatically-incorrect statement (should’ve been IN-, not ON-), this is a response only #pinoygamers will use to tell you to buzz-off and not disturb their game; “I’m on-game, pre”. You’ll know your online friend is Filipino, when they respond with their version of the cold, detached and uncaring text message reply of “k”.